On-Line Course on Rope Tying and Splicing for Seafarers

Instructor

Nannette Medel

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Overview

Overview

Welcome to this online course.I will teach how to do you 5 basic types of rope tying and splicing. This course is aimed at seafarers most especially: Cadets, Able Bodied Seaman (AB's) and Bosun's who often use this skill on-board tanker vessel particularly during rigging, tackles and other similar situations during operation.

The course contains 5 videos.  Most are no longer than 6 minutes.

Instructor

Training Director and Quality Manager of Net Ship Management, Inc.

Course Outline:

I. Introduction

      A. Description of the subject

      B.  Terminology

      C.  Required knowledge /skills

      D.  Infrastructure requirements

II. Target Competency

       A. Topics  needed to achieve competency

            a.  Required Tools, Machine and Materials

            b.  Knowledge (terms, definition, description)

            c.  Sources and other learning materials

III. Different types of rope tying and splicing

       A.  Bowline 

       B.  Timber Hitch

       C.  Clove Hitch

       D   Eye Splice

       E.  Back Splice  

IV. Assessment

    I. INTRODUCTION

          A. Description of the Subject

     Rope is one of the seaman’s most valuable and most constantly used tools.  It has been used continuously since man first put to sea. The development of knots and splices providing double, triple, and quadruple mechanical advantages have broadened the utility of rope.  Aside from its many standard uses in riggings and tackles, its flexibility and its almost universal adaptability enables the seaman to use it in a variety of situations.

         B. Terminology

     Wire rope - a type of cable which consists of several strands of metal wire laid (or ‘twisted’) into a helix.  The term cable is often used interchangeably with wire rope.  In general, wire rope refers to diameters larger than 3/8 inch.  Sizes smaller than this are designated as cable or cords. 

     Splicing  - is the forming of a semi-permanent joint between two wire ropes or two parts of the same wire rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands.  

    Rope splicing in ropework is the forming of a semi-permanent joint between two ropes or two parts of the same rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands. Splices can be used to form a stopper at the end of a line, to form a loop or an eye in a rope, or for joining two ropes together.

     Splices are preferred to knotted rope, since while a knot typically reduces the strength by 20-40%,  a splice is capable of attaining a rope's full strength. However, splicing usually results in a thickening of the line and, if subsequently removed, leaves a distortion of the rope.  Most types of splices are used on 3-strand rope, but some can be done on 12-strand or greater single-braided rope, as well as most double braids.

     C.  Required knowledge/ skills

          -  understand the safety implications

          -  understanding of the way ropes/wire are constructed.

     D.  Infrastructure requirements

          - clean and clear working environment  

II. TARGET COMPETENCY

             Learn how to do the 5 basic types of rope tying and splicing namely: bowline, clove hitchtimber hitch, back splice and eye splice which are required for Cadets, Able Bodied seaman (AB) and Bosun‘s on-board tanker vessels. 

     A. Topics needed to achieve competency

          a.  Required Tools, Machine and Materials

          FID - Used to create a gap between strands 

    WHIPPING TWINE - Twine, tape or fine wire can be used  for whipping the ends of the strands

     SAW - Strands are cut to length using a hacksaw

      FAT - Cable and the fid to ensure smoother insertion through the strands.

 

        b.  Knowledge (terms, definition, description)

 

                             KNOWLEDGE

 

Terms

Definition-description

Visual aids

Rope

A length of rope from wires twisted together as strands

Strands

One of the wires twisted together or laid parallel to form a wire, rope or cable

Twist

Direction of the wires making the rope

Whipping

Binding made of a softer twine to act as protection and to hold the wire during sp;licing

Eye

Loop in the end of a wire

       

        c.  Sources and other learning materials

                 http://www.boat-buiding.org/learn-skills/index.php/en/metal/splicing-a-steel-wire/ 

 

III. DIFFERENT TYPES OF ROPE TYING AND SPLICING

       A.  Bowline    

             The bowline is an ancient and simple knot used to form a fixed loop at the end of a rope.  It has the virtues of being both                easy to tie and untie;  most notably it is easy to untie after being subjected to a load. The bowline is sometimes referred                as King of the knots because of its importance. It is one of the five basic maritime knots.

             a. Bowline’s Usage      

                The knot is commonly used in sailing small craft, for example to fasten a halyard to the head of a sail or to tie a jib                         sheet to a clew of a jib. The bowline is also well known as a rescue knot for such purposes as rescuing who might have                 fallen down a hole, or off a cliff onto a ledge.

            b. Bowline Knot Tying Instructions

                •Lay the rope across your left hand with the free end hanging down. Form a small loop in the line in your hand.

                •Bring the free end up to and pass through the eye from the under side (the rabbit comes out of the hole).

                •Wrap the line around the standing line and back down through the loop (around the tree and back down the hole).

                •Tighten the knot by pulling on free end while holding standing line

            c.  Bowline instructional video

 

       B.  Timber Hitch

             The Timber Hitch is knot used to Attach a single length of rope to a cylindrical object. Secure while tension is maintained,              it is easily untied even after heavy loading.  The timber hitch is an old knot.  It is first known to have been mentioned in a                nautical source.

             a. Timber Hitch Usage

                 As the name suggests, this knot is often used by lumbermen and arborists for attaching ropes to tree trunks, branches,                  and logs.  For stability when towing or lowering long items,  the addition of a half-hitch in front of the timber hitch                            creates a timber hitch, or known as killick hitch when at sea.

             b. Timber Hitch Knot Tying Instructions

                 • Pass the working end of a rope around the object and take a turn around the standing part. Tuck the working end                          back around itself three times with the lay of the rope.

                 • Add one or two half hitches near the hauling end for hoisting and to keep load from twisting.

              c. Timber Hitch Instructional Video 

 

 

       C.  Clove Hitch

             The Clove Hitch is a type of knot.Along with the bowline and the sheet bend, it is often Considered one of the most                        important knots and is commonly referred to as a Double Hitch. A clove hitch is two successive half-hitches around an                    object.  It is most effectively used as a crossing knot. 

            a. Clove Hitch Usage

                As the name suggests, this knot is often used by lumbermen and arborists for attaching ropes to tree trunks, branches,                 and logs. For stability when towing or lowering long items, the addition of a half-hitch in front of the timber hitch creates                 a timber hitch, or known as killick hitch when at sea.

            b. Clove Hitch Knot Tying Instructions

               •  Pass the end of the  rope around the pole.  Continue over the standing end and around the pole a second time.                             Thread the end under itself and pull tight to form the clove hitch. 

            c. Clove Hitch Knot instructional video

 

       D.  Eye Splice

            The  eye splice is a method of creating a permanent loop in the end of multi stranded rope by means of rope splicing.                   The ends of the rope are tucked (plaited) back into the standing end to form the loop.  Three tucks are the minimum for                 natural fibers, five tucks are necessary for synthetics.

            a.  Eye Splice Usage 

                 The eye splice is used to place a permanent loop in the end of a rope, generally for attachment purposes to a fixed                        point. An eye is also used to form the rope around a thimble, which is used to protect the rope, especially when it is to                    be attached to a shackle, chain, or wire rope.

           b.  Eye splice instructions

                •  Tape rope. Unravel enough for 5 tucks (4 shown here). Arrange strands. Pass center one under a standing strand.

          c.  Eye Splice instructional video

 

        

E.  Back Splice  

     A splice where the strands of the end of the rope are spliced directly back into the end without forming a loop. It is used to              finish off the end of the rope to keep it from fraying. The end of the rope with the splice is about twice the thickness of the rest        of the rope. With nylon and other plastic materials, the back splice is often no longer used; the rope strands are simply fused        together with heat to prevent fraying

     a• Back Splice usage 

         The back splice provides a secure method of preventing the end of a rope from fraying.

     b• Back splice iinstruction

         Form a Crown Knot by passing each strand over its neighbor and then tighten the knot. Splice each strand into the rope by            passing it over and under alternate strands in the standing end. Complete a second and a third set of tucks to complete the          back splice.

     c. Back Splice instructional video

 

 

IV. ASSESSMENT

A.  Tasks to be done

    a.  Pictures of 5 actual finished products

B. Process

    a. Kindly arrange the process for making a bowline (number 1-4)

         ___•Bring the free end up to and pass through the eye from the under side (the rabbit comes out of the hole).

         ___•Wrap the line around the standing line and back down through the loop (around the tree and back down the hole).

         ___•Lay the rope across your left hand with the free end hanging down. Form a small loop in the line in your hand.             

         ___•Tighten the knot by pulling on free end while holding standing line

C. Usage and Application Questions:

    a.  Which knot is best used for rescue?

    b.  Which knot is best used for stability when towing or lowering long items?

    c.  Which splice provides a secure method of preventing the end of a rope from fraying?

    d.  How many tucks are needed as a  minimum for natural fibers?

    e.  How tucks  are necessary for synthetics?

 

 

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